Tag Archives: Shipping

How to Provide Box Level Details on Amazon FBA Shipments

box-content-info-blogIf you’ve been reading your seller emails from Amazon, you know that starting November 1, 2016, FBA sellers will be required to provide box level details of the contents of their shipments to FBA warehouses. Failing to provide those details will incur a fee for your shipments of 15 cents per item. Additionally, Amazon has stated that shipments without box contents provided might experience a slower check-in time than shipments providing the box level details.

The thought of adding an extra step to the FBA shipment process isn’t super appealing to most Amazon sellers – the fewer the steps the better, right? But I (Stephen) have added box level details to my shipments for the past month now, and I can tell you it’s not as bad as you might have heard.

sC_b001h9nxvg-boxpileReally, it’s in your best interest to start NOW learning how to add the details and practicing with shipments of various sizes. In the long run, spending 5-10 extra minutes per shipment to add the box level details will definitely save you money and potentially save you time: definitely the money from the fees for not providing the details and potentially the time of your shipment being delayed during check-in because you didn’t provide the details.

There are five ways you can handle adding the box level details to your shipment:

  1. Only ship one box at a time – no need to provide extra details.
  2. Ship multiple boxes, but only one SKU per box – no need to provide extra details.
  3. Ship 25 SKUs or less in multiple boxes, and you can provide details through the web-based form on Seller Central.
  4. Ship more than 25 SKUs in multiple boxes, and you can provide details through an Excel spreadsheet uploaded to Seller Central.
  5. Use a third-party listing software to provide details.

I’m not exaggerating when I say providing box contents will add only 5-10 minutes to packing your shipment. It really isn’t a long, time-consuming process. So far, I’ve been listing my shipments in Inventory Lab and then finishing out the shipment process (including providing box level details) in Seller Central. In the very near future I will try out Inventory Lab’s new box level detail process and report back on my thoughts on it.

For a tutorial of how to use the #3 and #4 methods above, I’ve made the following screen capture video walking you through the process.

As you can see in the video, the steps for filling out the forms are rather straightforward. To assist in the process of knowing which items I’ve packed in which boxes, I always print out my form so that I can check off the items on paper as I’m packing; then I transfer my check marks to the online form or Excel sheet once the boxes are packed.

money-fees-add-up-fastIf you decide that providing the box content details is too annoying or time-consuming, you do have the option to skip this step in the process, but you will incur a fee of 15 cents per item in that shipment. This may seem like a small fee, but be careful because those charges can add up quickly. Let me show you how.

I recently had a 92-item shipment of more than 25 SKUs, so the fees to skip the box level details for that shipment would be $13.80. I timed myself as I provided the box contents for the shipment through Excel, and it only added 6 minutes to my processing time. If you do the math, $13.80 in fees versus 6 minutes of my time means that I would have been paying Amazon $138/hour to allow me to skip that step. It’s worth it to me to just spend the extra 6 minutes and keep that $13.80 in fees to spend on more inventory to sell on Amazon.

As with so many other changes that happen over time in selling on Amazon, there will be a day in the not-so-distant future where adding box content details is ingrained in our minds as just one more step in the process, not as a new time-sucking step. Ultimately, providing box level details should theoretically help us as sellers have an easier time reconciling issues with lost inventory from shipments during the check-in process, which makes the entire process worth it, in my mind.

To read for yourself the Amazon guidelines about providing box level details, click here.

Have you been using the web form or Excel sheet to provide box level details on your Amazon FBA shipments? Do you have any advice to add on this topic? Please let us hear from you in the comments!

The Optimized Full-Time FBA Work & Shipping Station

Work Station TitleDo you need a warehouse in order to do the kind of volume it takes to make a full-time income from FBA? I’ve seen a few threads on social media and have had a few people ask me that exact question… and my answer to all of them is this: No, you do not need to rent or buy warehouse space in order to do the kind of volume needed to make a full-time income selling via Amazon FBA. 

Today, I want to give you a peek inside my optimized full-time FBA work and shipping station. Is this work station in a warehouse? No, it’s in the corner of my office on an old dining room table. Here is a diagram of the work station we currently use. Below is a description of each and every item we use and why.

Shipping Station Diagram

If you’re interested in learning more or want to add any these tools to your own FBA work station, click on the name or picture of the tool below. 

31X1IJMOzsLA. Cardboard Box Sizer and Reducer –  This tool helps you reduce your shipping boxes to the exact size that you need. Cutting your boxes down to size helps save you money in multiple ways: 1) Smaller boxes mean less shipping costs; 2) Smaller boxes mean you need less dunnage to fill boxes; 3) Less dunnage means that the box will weigh less, which saves you money over time. The tool is easy to handle, and I use it almost daily. For a quick video of the box sizer tool in action, click here

81K1bfSxJ5L._SL1500_B. 3-Inch Tape Gun – This was seriously a game changer when it came to optimizing my packing and shipping experience. For years, I’d only used a 2-inch tape gun, but one day I realized I was using about three strips of tape when securing the bottom and top of the box. I was using too much tape and wasting time as well. Now, I just use one strip of 3-inch tape to secure the base of the box and one strip of 3-inch tape to close the top of the box. It saves me both time and money. Find some 3-inch tape here

81bRMAxBB0L._SL1500_C. 2-Inch Tape Gun – While the 3-inch tape gun is perfect for securing shipping boxes, the 2-inch gun is better suited for smaller taping jobs. I use my 2-inch tape gun in multiple ways: 1) Secure bubble wrap when protecting a breakable item; 2) Tape over FNSKU labels that I worry might fall off of an item I’ve bubble wrapped; 3) Close up small holes in poly bags; 4) Secure smaller cardboard boxes that I use for bundles, and so much more. You can find 2-inch tape here

61h-B0szXtL._SL1280_D. Goo Gone Spray Gel  – Don’t you hate it when there is a price sticker on an item that just won’t come off cleanly? Goo Gone is the perfect solution to help get the sticky “goo” off your item. Simply spray some Goo Gone onto the sticky residue, and it will wipe off fairly easily. For really stubborn “goo,” use the Scotty Peeler in combination with the Goo-Gone to scrape away the excess goo. Note: There are many different products that you can use to remove the sticky adhesive left behind from a sticker. Some other alternatives are Un-Du and even lighter fluid

61ZZnk9VoJL._SL1200_E. Scotty Peelers – One of the most annoying parts of retail arbitrage is taking off the price stickers of your latest inventory purchase. These tools are the perfect way to peel off the stickers from the item without damaging the original package. If any of the sticky residue remains on the item, simply use the Goo Gone and scrape off the goo with the Scotty Peeler. 

71AgdoNhdML._SL1500_F. Scissors and Paper Towels – When you are cleaning sticker residue off of your inventory, you’ll need to use paper towels to help wipe up the mess. The scissors are used for multiple purposes, such as cutting poly bags, opening up boxes, cutting labels, and more. 

91hEUJSiPzL._SL1500_G. Excess Poly Bag & Trash Receptical – Ok, so this isn’t some fancy trash can, but a re-purposed empty pretzel tub, but it really works well. Most normal trash cans are the same size from top to bottom, but this tub is more rounded at the top and bottom. This makes it much easier to put the excess poly bag waste and any other trash inside the tub without it expanding and coming out of the trash can. It might seem silly, but it really works out well for us (see the “after” picture at the bottom of the blog to see how well it works). Oh, and the pretzels are pretty darn good too. 

H. Suffocation Warning Labels – Each and every poly bag that you use on a product needs to have a suffocation warning label. Some poly bags come with warnings printed on them, but for the ones that don’t, it’s a good idea to have these stickers handy. If you use a poly bag and do not make sure there is a suffocation warning on the bag, then you will be in violation of Amazon guidelines. These labels are easy to use and stay on well too. 

31yMUxZj7lLI. Stacking Letter Trays – These trays are where I store such supplies as my suffocation warning labels, expiration date labels, clear tape, pens, and more. 

J. Inspiration – Everybody needs some inspiration now and then, and one of the things that inspires me the most are my kids, nieces, and nephews. I love to hang their art up in my office to be reminded that there is so much more to life than work. It motivates me to use my work time more efficiently so that I can spend more time with them.  

71oPWM52EDL._SL1211_K. Poly Bags – According to Amazon guidelines, there are many items that need to be poly bagged if you plan on sending them to a FBA warehouse. These bags protect your inventory from the dirt and dust found in a FBA warehouse. Poly bags come in various sizes and thickness. Be sure you know what minimum requirements Amazon has for poly bags. The ones pictured are some of my favorite to order. 

41ot2QNlguL._SX425_L. 24-inch Centerfold Shrink Wrap Film – This is the shrink wrap film that I use for shrink-wrapping larger items like long board games, longer toys, and anything else longer than 14 inches. 

M. 14-inch Centerfold Shrink Wrap Film – This is the shrink film that I use for almost all other items I need to shrink wrap. It pairs well with my 16-inch impulse sealer (see below). 

71-uX1kHXoL._SL1500_N. Bubble Wrap – If you are selling anything made of glass or any other fragile item, you’ll want to protect it with quality bubble wrap. This bubble wrap is perforated every 12 inches so you can easily tear off only the amount of bubble wrap you need. 

61Wzt26rXXL._SL1000_O. 16-inch Impulse Sealer – People always ask me what size impulse sealer  they should get. Without any hesitation I tell them the 16-inch model. The first impulse sealer I purchased was a 14-inch model, and there were so many times I wished I had a longer reach for sealing. You might think that the extra 2 inches isn’t that big of a deal, but it really is. 

31YliKNB3LLP. Black & Decker Power Scissors – Ok, so many of you would probably be happy with an average utility knife, but these scissors are simply amazing. They make sizing down a box or creating a custom-sized box very easy. I use these almost every day that I’m packing and shipping. It saves tons of time and energy, and I simply won’t do without it. If the cost of a new one scares you, get a used one. That’s what I did and it has worked great for me. 

Not Pictured: 

41sRYiyp1ILQ. 1500 Watt Heat Gun – I use this heat gun in two ways: 1) To heat up the shrink-wrap so that it properly seals around the item I’m wanting to wrap for a very professional sealed look; 2) To heat up price stickers so they can be removed easier. When you apply heat to a price sticker or label, and use a Scotty peeler, the label comes off very easily. 

61sL7QYmSwL._SL1500_R. Shipping Scale – This scale looks small (because it is – 8″ x 8″) but it will weigh boxes up to 100lbs with accuracy. The weight is shown on an LCD display that is connected to the scale with an extendable cord. This means you can put a big, heavy box on the scale, but still see how much it weighs on the separate display. When shipping your items, you want to be sure your scale is accurate. An inaccurate scale could 715XNDGKPVL._SL1500_cost you hundreds of dollars a year. 

S. Hand Truck (Dolly) – When it’s time to take all of the boxes to UPS, I load them all up on this very sturdy hand truck and roll them out the front door. I can easily get three 18x18x16 boxes stacked on this dolly for easy transport. 

61Fm47z2QuS._SL1000_U. Measuring Tape – When you create your own box sizes, you really need to know the exact dimensions to tell Amazon so you can be charged the right amount for shipping. There are many other ways to use this in your FBA business, like if you are creating a new product page and need the exact dimensions of the product. 

91KNJpBoehL._SL1500_V. Dunnage (Void Fill) – Not every box will be filled to the top with items, so you need to be sure that there are void fillers placed in the box. My favorite dunnage are air pillows. When Amazon sends me a large box and includes air pillows inside, I always save them to use in my own shipments to FBA. When I run out of air pillows, I usually use newspaper that is tied up in a plastic grocery bag. It is against Amazon guidelines to use newspaper as void fill because they don’t want the newsprint to get on the items, but it is ok if you bag the newspaper and use that instead. Of course, air is lighter than paper and is my preferred method. Maybe one day I’ll splurge for an air pillow machine

Other than shipping boxes, which I usually get at Lowes or Home Depot, that is everything I use when I’m prepping, packing, boxing, and shipping. These are the tools I use almost every day in order to run my full-time FBA business. 

This is what my work & shipping station looks like at the end of the day. Click on the image for a close up.

This is what my work & shipping station looks like at the end of the day. Click on the image for a close up.

TIP: Bookmark this page so when you are ready to add something new to your work station, you have a handy list of what you want to add.

Whenever my wife and I come in from a huge retail arbitrage haul (sometimes hundreds of items in one day) we bring the items into the house, remove the price stickers (usually in front of the TV or while listening to an audiobook), poly bag any item that needs it, and then place all the items on the floor near the desk to be inventoried and processed on the laptop. Once the items have been processed, we raise the drop leaf on the table so there’s space to box up everything. Add the shipping labels, and we’re ready to send our inventory off to Amazon. No warehouse required. 

Now I want to hear from you. What tools are your favorite? How do you make the most of the space at your house for doing your FBA business? I’d love to see what you use, so comment below!

Sell to the World with FBA Global Export

Screen Shot 2014-09-24 at 11.07.32 AMHow would you like to have more eyes looking at your products on Amazon? What about increased FBA sales? All of this, and more, is possible thanks to FBA Global Export. When you first sign up to sell on Amazon via FBA, the default mode is for you to sell your inventory only to customers in the United States. Sure, the bulk of the traffic on Amazon.com comes from those in the United States, but there are millions of customers outside of the States who might be interested in buying your product. You want these potential customers to see your products and to have the ease of buying them via FBA.

FBA Export allows FBA sellers in the US to offer a majority of their inventory for sale all around the world. Getting set up with FBA export is easy. Let me walk you through the steps.

1. Sign in to Seller Central here
2. Hover over the Settings in the top right corner of Seller Central and then click on Fulfilled by Amazon.
3. Scroll down and in the Export Settings section, click on Edit.
4. Click to Enable FBA Global Export.
5. Upload a signature file (more on this here).
6. Read and click that you agree with the Amazon Business Solutions Agreement. 
7. Press submit and you are done! 
 

If you are not currently set up with FBA Global Export, then you’re missing out on more sales and increased profits. Just today, I sold a book to a customer in Great Britain, a toy to Ecuador, and a board game to Australia. These are sales that I would not have had if I were not set up with FBA Global Export.

world-wide-300x275In our next blog post, I’ll talk about all of the benefits of FBA Global Export, but I’ll let you in on my favorite benefit today: Since there are so few FBA sellers set up to sell globally, I actually get the buy box for the international buyers at a higher price than those not offering their products internationally. I have one toy in particular that I have about 30 currently in stock. I have this toy priced about $3 to $4 more than the current lowest FBA offer, but none of the other sellers of this toy are set up with FBA Global Export, so I get all those international sales! The US based sellers are all priced around $9, but I’m getting all the international sales at $13 each. After all is said and done, that’s $120 more that I’ll get for selling the same item.

Note: FBA Export does not list your products on other Amazon marketplaces. Instead, FBA Export allows your products to be shipped directly to international customers who already shop on the US Amazon.com marketplace. You also need to have a Pro Seller account to qualify for Global Export.

Not only will our next blog post talk about all of the benefits of FBA Global Export, but we’ll also discuss all of the possible fears you may have with selling internationally. Feel free to comment below with your thoughts on selling internationally via FBA.

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Imagine knowing exactly what to expect in your Amazon FBA business every month of the year.

Imagine what it would feel like knowing you were not missing out on any of the opportunities that will come your way this year. 

Imagine working on your Amazon business knowing exactly what your priorities are, what you need to avoid, and what you need to accomplish during each month to make progress toward making this year your best sales year ever.

Find out more about The Reseller’s Guide to a Year in FBA: A Month by Month Guide to a Profitable Amazon Business today. The package includes a 200-page ebook, monthly live webinars, and 4 special bonuses.

How to Make the Most of Amazon FBA Split Shipments

Split ShipmentsLast month, we talked about Amazon Split Shipments and the options you have between Distributed Inventory Placement (DIP) or Inventory Placement Service (ISP). Today, we’re going to take the conversation to the next level and talk about how to make the most of whatever placement decision you make. For most of us, this decision should not be a one time decision where we set things up and forget about it. A lot of time and money can be wasted if you don’t have a strategy in how you choose to react to Amazon split shipments.

The following are different shipping situations I have found myself in. I’ll do my best to explain how I have dealt with Amazon split shipments and why I felt it was the best decision to make.

Note: When I mention BNA3, PHX6, RIC2, etc, I am referring to the code names of individual Amazon fulfillment centers that are spread throughout the country.

A. Shipment contains 250 items.

138 → BNA3
  70 → PHX6
  42 → RIC2

I leave this shipment with Distributed Inventory Placement (the default). There are more than enough items in each individual shipment to warrant the shipping costs. It’s not worth it to pay $0.30 per item to send them all to the same FBA warehouse.

B. Shipment contains 30 items.

26 → BNA3
 2 → PHX6
 1 → RIC2
 1 → ABE2

You have four options with this situation:

1. You can send the items in under Distributed Inventory Placement, but you’ll overpay in shipping costs to send only two items to PHX6, one to RIC2, and one to ABE2. This option might cost you about $15-$20 more than it needs to cost.

2. You can turn on Inventory Placement Service and pay around $0.30 per item. This will make sure (most of the time) that they will all go to the same fulfillment warehouse. In this example, you will be charged a fee of $9.00 ($0.30 x 30) for all 30 items to be sent to the same FBA warehouse. Note: Inventory Placement only promises not to split up quantities of ASINs, not that all of your shipment will go to the same place – although most of the time that’s what happens.

3. You can send in your shipment of 26 items to BNA3, and then delete the other shipments. Maybe next time you enter them in, they’ll all go to the same fulfillment center. Important: I do not recommend deleting shipments on a regular basis. This will hurt your seller metrics in the long run, and should only be used in rare circumstances.

4. You can go ahead and send in your shipment of 26 items to BNA3, but leave PHX6, RIC2, and ABE2 open. While leaving these shipments open, you can add more items on a future date. Once you have enough items (maybe 8-10 items or 8-10 pounds worth of items), then you can proceed with sending them in.

The tricky thing about Inventory Placement Services, is that you need to turn it on before you even start a shipment. If you want to use ISP, then the most likely situations when you would need it would be: 1) if you had a small amount of inventory to ship and/or 2) if you had a smaller shipment with multiples of the same SKU. When you have multiples of the same item, Amazon likes to spread those out at different fulfillment centers. Most likely, these two circumstances would be the times that you would consider using ISP. Just don’t forget to turn IPS off when you’re about to start a new, large shipment.

cardboard-box-open-lgPersonally, I don’t think it’s a wise financial decision to pay $0.30 – $0.40 per item to send them all to the same warehouse. If I have a shipment of 50 items where Amazon wants to send 48 items to Indiana and 2 items to Arizona, I am not going to pay $15 just so that I’ll avoid paying an extra $10 to ship those two items to a Arizona. To me, it’s just not worth it. Most of the time, I’ll simply leave the smaller shipment open and wait until I have enough items to make a full box which, overall, makes the shipping cost lower.

On the other hand, just because it’s not worth it to me, doesn’t mean that Inventory Placement Service isn’t a good decision for you. You may not be able to wait for a larger shipment to send your inventory in. You might not have the storage space to hold even a few items at your house, or the item you just bought might be a super hot toy item that needs to get to FBA ASAP. In that case, do the math and see if Inventory Placement Service is right for you. If you decide that inventory placement is a long term solution for you, then be sure you include that in your costs when you are out sourcing an item for resale.

So what do you think about using inventory placement service? Is it worth it to you? What other split shipment situations have you been in? I’d love to hear your thoughts on this.

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Imagine knowing exactly what to expect in your Amazon FBA business every month of the year.

Imagine what it would feel like knowing you were not missing out on any of the opportunities that will come your way this year. 

Imagine working on your Amazon business knowing exactly what your priorities are, what you need to avoid, and what you need to accomplish during each month to make progress toward making this year your best sales year ever.

Find out more about The Reseller’s Guide to a Year in FBA: A Month by Month Guide to a Profitable Amazon Business today. The package includes a 200-page ebook, monthly live webinars, and 4 special bonuses.

Amazon Split Shipments And What You Can Do About Them

It’s the number one question I hear from those who are new to selling via Amazon FBA: Why is Amazon forcing me to send my inventory to multiple warehouses all over the country? It’s expensive, inconvenient, and it’s cutting into my profit margins. What can I do to fix this?

brownbox2In a perfect world, Amazon sellers would be able to take all of the items they are selling, send them to a single FBA warehouse, and continue to see those items sell quickly. Unfortunately, we don’t live in a perfect world. Amazon has their reasons for shipping our inventory to multiple fulfillment centers, so it’s important for us to understand why Amazon wants to do this.

As you probably know by now, Amazon is the most customer-centric company ever. Everything Amazon does is to make the customer happy. In relation to inventory, Amazon wants to have as many items spread out across the United States as possible. The closer an item is to the buyer, the faster that item can get there, which helps secure a happy customer. If you have a toy to sell, and Amazon already has that toy in stock in Florida, Dallas, Tennessee, and Colorado, then maybe they’ll have you ship your toy to California, where that toy is currently out of stock. When a customer in California wants that specific toy, and that toy is priced competitively, then you have a great chance of winning the buy box and getting the sale.

article_icebreakerUnderstanding why Amazon splits up your inventory doesn’t always make split shipments any easier. It can be frustrating when the bulk of your inventory is going to Indiana, yet one item needs to go to Tennessee, two items need to go to Texas, and another item to Arizona. For many of us, the cost of sending just one or two items to a separate FBA warehouse can completely destroy our profit margins.

So what is a FBA seller to do? Well, you have two options: Distributed Inventory Placement or Inventory Placement Service. Distributed Inventory Placement is where you let Amazon pick where it thinks your inventory should be shipped to. This is the default for those who sell via Amazon FBA.

Screen Shot 2014-05-22 at 8.43.26 AMThe other option you have is called Inventory Placement Service (Click here for Amazon’s page outlining inventory placement options). Choosing Inventory Placement will generally create one shipment for most of your standard sized inventory. I say generally, because Amazon actually only promises that they will send all quantities of a single MSKU to a single FBA warehouse. They do not promise that all items in your shipment will be sent to the same warehouse, but more often than not, they will. There are exceptions, such as oversized items, clothes, shoes, and some media (books, DVDs, etc), which will still need to be sent to a specific warehouse other than the main one you usually send inventory to. The inventory placement fee is currently 30 to 40 cents for each standard-sized unit and $1.30 for each oversized item. Click here to see the current fee structure. Remember, this fee is paid for every item that you are sending in to Amazon, not just on the multiples that might get split up if you did not have Inventory Placement turned on.

Here’s how to turn on Inventory Placement Service:

1. Log in to Seller Central
2. Go to “Settings” and click “Fulfillment by Amazon.”
3. Under “Inventory Placement” click “edit.”
4. Choose your preferred option (The default is Distributed Inventory Placement)
5. Click “update.”
 

Before you head on over to Amazon to update your inventory placement settings, it’s a good idea to weigh the positives with the negatives of Inventory Placement Service.

shutterstock_128422982Positives:

1. Multiples of the same MSKU will not be split into different shipments and will all go to the same warehouse.

2. No more shipments of a single item to a different warehouse.

3. Your inventory will most likely be shipped to one of the warehouses close to you. This could mean lower shipping costs and less time your shipments are in transit.

4. Since your inventory will most likely be shipped to a nearby warehouse, you’ll get faster processing times, and your inventory could go live much quicker. The faster your inventory is processed, the faster it can be sold.

Negatives:

1. The cost of 30 to 40 cents per item could add up quickly and eat into your profit margins. If you have a shipment of 100 items, that could cost you $30 in Inventory Placement fees alone.

2. Inventory placement doesn’t promise that all items in a shipment will go to the same warehouse, it only promises that multiples of the same item (MSKU) will not be split into multiple warehouses. So, you still may have to send items to three different FBA warehouses.

3. Here is a little known secret: Amazon ships your inventory to different warehouses without you even knowing it. You might have shipped your inventory to Tennessee, but after it’s processed, it could easily be removed and sent to Florida. While Amazon is shipping your item to Florida it’s considered “inactive” and cannot be sold. I believe that Amazon takes the money it makes from the Inventory Placement Fees and uses that money to reallocate your inventory across the country.

Most Amazon FBA sellers don’t like shipping their inventory to so many warehouses, but it’s up to you to decide whether it’s worth it to pay the Inventory Placement Fees or not. I, personally do not. The fact that Amazon will temporarily deactivate some of my inventory while it moves those items across the country is a deal breaker for me.

To read more about Amazon split shipments and our strategy for how to minimize shipping costs and FBA fees, click here.

So what about you? Do you use Inventory Placement Service? If so, what do you like or dislike about it? Let us know if you have any questions about these options.

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Imagine knowing exactly what to expect in your Amazon FBA business every month of the year.

Imagine what it would feel like knowing you were not missing out on any of the opportunities that will come your way this year. 

Imagine working on your Amazon business knowing exactly what your priorities are, what you need to avoid, and what you need to accomplish during each month to make progress toward making this year your best sales year ever.

Find out more about The Reseller’s Guide to a Year in FBA: A Month by Month Guide to a Profitable Amazon Business today. The package includes a 200-page ebook, monthly webinars, and 4 special bonuses.