Tag Archives: Arbitrage

Beginner Lessons For Selling Shoes on Amazon FBA

When it comes to sourcing and selling shoes on Amazon, some of the hardest lessons are learned during the early stages of adding shoes to your Amazon business model.

Many of you know that Rebecca and I are a team when it comes to our Amazon FBA business. While I mainly focus on retail arbitrage and wholesale sourcing, she is the specialist when it comes to online arbitrage… and specifically sourcing and selling shoes.

Since my last interview video with Rebecca was so well received, I decided to sit down with her and record another Q&A  interview video with her. Rebecca has such a wealth of knowledge about sourcing and selling shoes and you’ll learn a lot in this video.

In the video below, you’ll learn:

  • How our very first experiment with sourcing and selling shoes went (spoiler: it didn’t go so well)
  • What we learned from that experiment
  • How we almost decided to give up selling shoes – and why we’re so glad we didn’t quit.
  • The biggest thing we wish we knew when we started selling shoes
  • The mindset shift you need to be successful with selling shoes
  • The biggest difference between sourcing items like books/toys and sourcing shoes
  • How to overcome not being able to see sales rank history of shoes
  • Which is better? Going wide or going deep when sourcing shoes?
  • How to find confidence in sourcing shoes
  • How customer returns of shoes are not as bad as returns from other categories (despite what other people might say).

Enjoy! Leave us a comment below the video if you have a specific shoe question and we’ll see about addressing that in a future video.

If you like the shirts we’re wearing in the video above, you can get them right here on Amazon.

Want to learn more? Rebecca and I recently hosted a FREE webinar all about how to get started with selling shoes on Amazon and added it to our YouTube channel. Just follow the link above to see the webinar in its entirety.

The Best Items to Buy on Craigslist and Sell via Amazon FBA

Craigslist Amazon FBAIf you’re like me, you get tired of chasing the next clearance sale at the big national retail chains, only to have your retail arbitrage finds “tank” in price before you even get your inventory sent in to the Amazon FBA warehouse. Sure, there are times when you can beat other sellers to the punch and be the first one to sell your items after the big sale, but other times…well, we know that other times after those big clearance sales, we end up with a mess of dead inventory to clean up when long term storage fees roll around.

One easy way to combat the problem of competing in the midst of market saturation is to source items that other sellers can’t find – or at least they can’t find it for the same low, low, low price that you can. And what’s one often overlooked place to source hard-to-find deals?

Craigslist!

I know, I know, Craigslist has a bad rap at times because buyers and sellers both can flake out on you at the last minute, and you have to be careful of scammers. But if you take the right safety precautions and do the right research, you can find some super sweet deals on Craigslist that you can turn into big profits on Amazon.

Here are my top 4 items that I love to source on Craigslist to sell on Amazon:

  1. textbooks.resizedTextbooks

If you live in a college town, you’ll find textbooks sold by the lot on Craigslist at the end of each semester. Even if you don’t live in a college town, some students will bring their books home during the summer to sell on Craigslist.

Students know that by selling their books back to the campus bookstore, they might only earn $4 or $5 – and they can sell them on Craigslist for $10. Many of those books could be sold on Amazon for anywhere from $40 to over $100, so keep an eye out for them.

  1. 71SxOT00EwL._SL1000_LEGO

LEGO tends to always have amazing sales ranks on Amazon. Whether you list them as new or collectible, they seem to sell almost as soon as they hit the FBA warehouse shelves.

Sometimes you can find LEGO lots on Craigslist, but you can also find individual sets. Maybe a kid had a set that he put together a few years ago, it’s been sitting on his desk collecting dust, and now that he’s grown and leaving the house, the parents are selling that set on Craigslist, complete with box and instructions. Or maybe a kid got a LEGO set for a gift, only opened bag #1, and decided he didn’t want to put the set together after all. And there are even the rare occasions where you can find new, unopened LEGOs for sale on Craigslist by someone who’s just looking to get rid of stuff.

If you want to sell a LEGO set on Amazon as collectible, you need to make sure that each and every piece is included, along with any minifigures and stickers. You don’t need the original box, but you do need to include instructions, whether it’s the original instructions or a copy you’ve downloaded and printed from online. You must include detailed descriptions in your condition notes telling whether you have the original box or instructions.

Bonus tip: LEGO minifigures can sometimes be sold individually in collectible condition for big profits. We are always on the lookout for minifigures from the Harry Potter sets.

  1. IMG_8909bBoard games

You probably know by now that I love board games so much that I wrote a book about selling them – The Reseller’s Guide to Board Games: How to Turn Play Money into Real Money. One of the places I keep an eye out for board games, new or collectible, is Craigslist. You can buy an entire lot of board games with the intention of only selling a portion of them on Amazon, and then resell the rest of them at your next garage sale. Make sure you message the seller ahead of time on Craigslist to find out if all the pieces are included.

  1. 91P+T0RUT2L._SL1500_Ride-on toys

Many people sell their children’s ride-on toys on Craigslist once they’re finished playing with them. These toys will be considered oversized on Amazon, but you know from our previous blog post that you can make big money selling big items on Amazon.

Do a search on your local Craigslist for “ride-on toys,” “ride-on animals,” or “ride-on cars” to find profitable toys you can sell in collectible condition. We have a favorite ride-on toy that we love to find on Craigslist for $40 or $50 and can sell it on Amazon in collectible condition for $400 to $500, depending on the time of year. It may take a little extra effort to put together a box for shipping it in to FBA, but that effort is worth it for the big ROI.

Buying these items on Craigslist is a win-win situation for both you and the seller. They’re getting cash for an item they no longer want, and you’re getting an item to sell on Amazon that will have less competition and less chance of “tanking” prices. The best way to keep an eye out for these items to resell is by setting up automatic searches and notifications through websites like Noticraig or IFTTT. That way you don’t have to constantly repeat your search, but you can just sit back and wait for the notification to come to you.

Word of caution about Craigslist: Always arrange to pick up your items in a public place, like a parking lot or even the police station. If possible, don’t go to pick up the item alone.

Have you bought items from Craigslist to resell on Amazon? Do you have any favorites that we’ve missed here?

The Perfect Starter Kit for the Online Arbitrage Beginner

My name is Rebecca, I’m a recovering online arbitrage skeptic.

OA KeyboardLast year when Stephen and I started hearing a lot of buzz about people switching to doing more online arbitrage (OA), less retail arbitrage (RA), we had so much going on with our business that we just tucked away the idea of OA in the back of our minds.

Fast forward a few months, and Chris Green released his latest book, Online Arbitrage, amid much fanfare in the reseller community. Again, Stephen and I questioned, is OA really all that great? Do we really need to try it out? I took one look at the book’s price tag (whoa, that thing’s pricey!), another look at the calendar (it was a few weeks from Q4, do we really want to invest in learning a new skill?), and I convinced Stephen not to buy the book right away.

Fast forward another several months (I promise this story is going somewhere). The adrenaline of Q4 subsided, and we were deciding where to focus in the new year. We love setting goals and learning new skills, and we tossed around the idea (again!) of becoming serious about OA. The idea of sourcing from home was definitely appealing, but I was still struggling to overcome my biggest hangup computer-frustrationwith the concept of OA: hours and hours of clicking on websites, with one or two purchases? No, thanks. Spending the time and effort to find and train a virtual assistant? Huh-uh, don’t want to do that either. We weren’t wanting to dedicate a massive portion of our sourcing capital towards OA, just enough to experiment — it didn’t seem like there was an easy way to get our feet wet without investing a lot of time and money.

Until we heard about Cyber Monkey Deals (CMD). Stephen has been a member of the ScannerMonkey Facebook group from its beginning, and when we saw the posts about the new deal site, we were intrigued. So, we took the plunge and got a subscription, as well as a copy of Chris Green’s Online Arbitrage at long last.

OA Starter KitRemember how I said I’m a recovering OA skeptic? Seriously, I’ve been the one all along who has told Stephen I didn’t want to do OA, I didn’t want to spend money on a pricey book, I wasn’t interested in getting another monthly subscription, blah blah blah blah.

But now that we’ve been doing CMD for a few months and I’ve finished reading Online Arbitrage, I’m hooked. I’m the one who looks through our CMD list of deals each day, I’m the one responsible for making our OA purchases, and I’m the one quoting sections of the OA book to Stephen. I can’t say enough about how this combo of resources — Cyber Monkey Deals combined with my Kindle copy of Online Arbitrage — has given us a boost in the direction of doing solid OA sourcing.

First, let me give you a few reasons why I’m glad I finally got around to reading Online Arbitrage:

OAcover800– Online Arbitrage spells out exactly how to set up your browser to maximize your time doing OA sourcing. Seriously…exactly. Which browser works best, which extensions to use, what order to look at things each day. Time is precious, and if you follow his instructions and just practice on a regular basis, you will pick up speed and keep from wasting hours on needless tasks.

– If you aren’t well versed in how to read graphs for sales rank and price, he’s got a lot of great tips for making sense of those numbers. This is crucial not just in doing OA, but in any type of sourcing for FBA. The skills I’ve honed while practicing what I’ve learned in OA have carried over while I’m doing retail arbitrage, and I’m able to make sourcing decisions more quickly and confidently when I’m out scanning in stores. To me, that was a huge boost.

– If you get the Kindle version of OA, you’re getting a multimedia OA course, not just a book. Some days you feel like reading, some days you feel like watching and listening — the Kindle version has both (you’ll want to read/watch on a Kindle tablet or on a Kindle app on your phone, tablet, or computer). The paperback version is great, too, but you’ll have to use the links to watch the extras on a device.

– Like other books I’ve read by Chris Green, Online Arbitrage has more than just skills outlined in it. You also get a look into the mindset of a business expert — and when you spend time getting to know how someone else thinks, you learn more than just skills. You learn the root of what makes people successful at their work, which is priceless. It’s not just knowledge; it’s wisdom.

CyberMonkey-lgNow, with that knowledge base, Cyber Monkey Deals has become one of my favorite ways to source each day. Because we weren’t wanting to invest a ton of money or time in OA to begin with, I’ve found that the deals on CMD are just perfect for us, for the following reasons:

– Ten deals a day is a good amount for me to look through. Getting a virtual assistant to send me a whole spreadsheet of deals would be overwhelming. We only want to spend a few hundred dollars a month on OA right now, so I don’t need to get bogged down in dozens of potential deals a day.

– The parameters of what constitutes a good deal on CMD work well for us and are constantly being fine-tuned by the admin. We’re on our fourth or fifth month of our subscription, and we’ve seen improvement over time in how many deals are worth a second look. Now, ten deals a day doesn’t mean that we’ll get ten deals that we buy each day. Some days we may get five deals worth taking action on, and other days none. But it evens out over the course of a week or so, and we’ve had a constant flow of inventory showing up on our doorstep since getting our CMD subscription.

– Again, using the CCC and Keepa graphs linked to each CMD deal I’ve been able to get faster and more confident at making good buying decisions, which has greatly impacted my sourcing in all areas of our business.

– Over time CMD has helped me fine-tune the types of items I’m looking for and the categories I want to sell in, whether I’m doing OA or RA. Consistency of practice is key in improving any skills, and that includes scanning and sourcing. I’ve been working with Stephen at our FBA business for a couple of years now, but I have a lot of other work responsibilities and endless work around the house — never have I sourced as much and as regularly as I have since getting our CMD subscription. Now I look at items and practice making buying decisions EVERY. SINGLE. DAY. Without leaving the house!

IMG_2976I could gush on and on about how exciting the past few months have been for me as an online reseller learning the world of OA. Stephen is, by background and gifting, the serious business person in our relationship — I’m the one who has come into doing business more reluctantly and timidly, having to take steps out of my comfort zone all along the way. Reading Online Arbitrage and looking through Cyber Monkey Deals each day for the past few months have given me the perfect Online Arbitrage Starter Kit. Both resources have helped me grow into a new role as the one responsible for our business’s OA branch. Who knows where things will go from here, but it’s been an exciting start for me!

Note: Chris Green’s book, Online Arbitrage is available in full color, black and white, and even a 3 chapter preview mini-book. It’s also recently been updated with all new information for July 2015.

What’s been your experience with online arbitrage? If you haven’t tried it yet, what’s holding you back? If you have experience with OA, what’s been your favorite thing about it? We’d love to hear your thoughts.

Want to learn more? Check out this blog post we did on how to take online arbitrage to the next level. In that post I talk about how I use daily deal lists and the OAXray software to speed up and automate the process of finding OA deals to buy and resell.

My Top 6 Manual Repricing Strategies (#3 Increases My Payout Big Time!)

price-tag-267x300No matter if you have one hundred, one thousand, or even ten thousand items in your Amazon inventory, having your items priced competitively is one of the best ways to increase profits. No matter how long your inventory has been sitting in an Amazon warehouse, it’s very likely that new competition has come into the picture. Once you learn how to reprice your inventory, then it’s time to put that knowledge to work for you. Today I want to teach you my 6 most profitable strategies for repricing inventory.

1. Reprice “old” inventory – The items that have been sitting in a FBA warehouse the longest are most likely the items not priced competitively. I started selling on Amazon in 2011, and thankfully, all of the inventory I sent in in 2011 has sold. One reason is because I regularly reprice the items that have been in my inventory the longest. To sort your inventory to show you what’s been there the longest, simply click on the “Date Opened” column. To sort from oldest to newest, just click on the little triangle under the “Date Opened” text. This will show you the items that have been there the longest (The only instance where this is not the case is for the items in your inventory that you consistently replenish). Look through your oldest inventory and price competitively.

2. Reprice “high quantity” inventory – This one always gives me a big boost in my number of sales and helps me avoid potential long term storage fees. Sort your inventory by clicking on the “available” column. Click on the little triangle under the word “available” to sort that column from most to least. Currently, the item I have the most inventory for has 47 items and a great rank. I’m only a few dollars above the lowest FBA price, so if I competitively reprice that item, then I’ll see an immediate boost in sales. Remember, twice a year (February 15 and August 15) FBA charges a long term storage fee for all items that have been at their fulfillment centers for 6 months or longer. This long term storage fee for 6 months is $11.25 per cubic foot… and the fee for 12 months is $22.50 per cubic foot, so it’s a fee you definitely want to avoid at all costs.

3. Reprice “high priced” inventory – This one is my favorite, because it usually brings me high dollar profits fast! Sort your inventory by price by clicking on the “Your Price” column. Again, click on the little triangle to sort your price from highest to lowest. Most of the time, my price is still very close to the current low FBA price, but other times, my price is way above the current low FBA price. I do the necessary research and price competitively. Almost as soon as I reprice my high priced items, I get sales. Of course, not all of my high-priced inventory sells out, but the increase in sales of high priced items definitely increases my net payout for that payment cycle.

0074677526400_500X5004. Reprice “newest” inventory – If you have items that sell immediately after they arrive at a FBA warehouse, you may want to make sure that your price is optimized for maximum profit. Just last month I sent in five Elsa dolls to FBA. In the first few hours after arriving I had already sold two at $49.99. I quickly went in and saw that not only was I selling at the lowest FBA price, but the next highest price was $64.99. I immediately raised my price to $64.99 and by the end of the day, I sold out. If I had not been aware of my sales, or if I did not reprice these items fast enough, then I would have missed out on more profit.

5. Reprice “expiring” items – If you sell grocery items or other items that come with an expiration date, then it’s a good idea to reprice any inventory that might be getting close to Amazon’s cut off dates for expiration. Remember, Amazon’s expiration date guidelines state that any items within 50 days of expiring will be removed for disposal by Amazon. If you have any items nearing the 50 day mark, it would be wise to reprice your item to sell ASAP.

41Cq9F-SqgL._SY300_6. Reprice “seasonal” inventory – This is a strategy that I employ the least, but if your business model is more focused on fast nickels (AKA fast turns), then this strategy will bring back some capital for you to invest in other more fast-turning items. There is no way to sort seasonal inventory by columns, so you’ll need to do key word searches on your inventory page. Keywords like Christmas, Easter, Summer, etc will help you find most of your seasonal items. You also might want to scroll through your active inventory to see if you find any other seasonal items that these key words overlook. My business model is more of a well-balanced model as I want to include both fast nickels and slow dimes. I’m ok with waiting a few months for price and demand to rise up to where my current prices are for Summer items. But if you’d rather have that capital back ASAP to invest elsewhere, then this strategy will work great for you.

I’ll do a blog post soon about how I price my inventory, but here is a sneak peek. It’s a combination of many different factors: the price I paid for the item, prices of FBA competition, current sales rank, sales rank history, and pricing history. I even listen to what my intuition tells me when I price my items. After doing this for so long, I’ve started to get a feeling of how to best price my items. My main goal is to price items competitively. Sometimes I want to be the lowest FBA price and sometimes I want to match the lowest FBA price. Other times I price my items above the current low price, because I think I can get more for my items eventually. It’s a detailed process, and I’ll gladly share with you more about my pricing strategies in a later blog.

As always, there will be exceptions to these repricing strategies, but overall, they should help you sell more items and get more capital back into your pocket than if you had left the prices alone.

So what about you? What pricing strategies do you like best? Any strategies you use that I don’t? I’d love to hear your thoughts.

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To find out everything there is to know about using CamelCamelCamel and Keepa to make smart sourcing decisions, be sure to check out our course, The Reseller’s Guide to How to Keepa Camel: Using Amazon Sales History to Make Smart Sourcing Decisions. This course is a combo ebook and video course where I walk you through everything you need to know to make sense of both CamelCamelCamel and Keepa in ways you’ve never thought of.

To Share or Not to Share a BOLO

man-looking-through-binoculars2In our last blog post, we talked about how to capitalize on a BOLO. We shared many ideas of how to make the most out of both your time and your money when it comes to a BOLO.  Note: In today’s blog, we’ll be discussing retail store BOLOs (not garage sale, thrift store, or other types of BOLOs).

As you may know, BOLO stands for “Be On the Look Out” and generally refers to a hard-to-find product that you need to be looking for in order to buy cheap and flip for high profits. It only takes a few months of doing FBA to recognize that you keep finding a specific product that seems to resell fairly fast. Most BOLOs are  hard to find (i.e. limited production or out of print items), but sometimes it’s an item that can be found many places. You’re always on the look out for these items and sometimes hop from store to store looking for them. It could be clearance or regular priced, but you always are looking for them to buy and flip.

Some resellers are totally against sharing BOLOs while others share them often. So what should you do when you find a BOLO? Should you share it or keep the find to yourself? The choice is up to you, but I’d like for you to consider a few things before making your choice.

1. Is it really a BOLO?

Just because you scan an item and all the Amazon sellers are asking big bucks for it, doesn’t make it a BOLO. The rank and the ROI (return on investment) both need to be good. It would help if the product has good reviews and is a brand name. Just because you scan “Miss Suzy Cries A Lot” (a toy with no sales rank) and everyone on Amazon is asking $200 for it, doesn’t make it a BOLO.

2. Is it possible that this item really isn’t that hard to find?

Hard To FindThink of what would happen if you shared a BOLO that could be found at almost every Walmart store. Sure, you keep buying that item for $5 and selling it for $25, but what would happen if 100+ other resellers started doing the same thing? Chances are that, over time, the price would most likely be lowered significantly, and you would not resell your item as fast as you were before. Maybe you have the patience to wait for the prices to rise back to what you’d like to sell it for, but the timing for that possible rise is completely unknown. If the item is not hard to find, then it might be in your own best interest to keep this find to yourself.

3. Are you OK with revealing someone else’s BOLO?

Sure, you may have found a great item from Walgreens to flip. In fact, you drove all over town to visit all 10 Walgreens in your area to buy them out of that particular item. You sent the items in to Amazon, and they sold fast. You keep going to Walgreens to see if they will be restocked, but they never are. You decide to share your BOLO find online so you could help others, but someone else isn’t too happy about it. You see, they too have found that item and have been reselling it on Amazon for months. Their stores keep restocking, so they keep reselling. But now, someone else has shared this item online and what once was a quick source of income for them has now slowed down dramatically.

4. How would you feel if someone broadcasted your personal BOLO?

I’ve had one of my BOLO items broadcasted, and I wasn’t too happy about it. But it also didn’t ruin my day. I know that this is just part of business, and I expect it to happen again sometime.

I’m not telling anyone what decision to make when it comes to sharing BOLOs, but I do think that we all need to think about these things before we post a BOLO publicly.

So, what do you do if someone shares one of your precious BOLOs and you’re not happy about it? How you respond to this happening to you could either make or lose you money in the long run, so it’s very important to think about how to best respond.

1. Respond with respect. Most of the responses I’ve seen online to BOLO broadcasts have been rude and disrespectful. This kind of response does no good for anyone.

2. Respond with a direct message. Consider sending a direct message to the one who posted the BOLO and explain your situation. Perhaps they’d consider removing the post if they understood where you are coming from. I think most people would understand and possibly remove the BOLO broadcast.

3. Decide how you want to react with your current BOLO items on Amazon. If you think that hundreds of your BOLO items are headed to Amazon, do you want to sell out as fast as possible, or will you hold on to the item and wait it out? I teach that patience brings profits, but I also know that some of you work with a business model that focuses on quick flips.

BOLOs are great, but don’t focus your business around them. They are nice every now and then, but eventually others will find out about this item or the store you buy them from will not restock them anymore. A business model focused around BOLOs will not survive in the long run. You need to have a well rounded list of inventory items (long tail, short tail, BOLOs, etc).

What do you think? What experiences do you have with BOLOs? Is there a good time to share a BOLO? What have you learned about BOLOs that you’d like to share with the group? I’d love to hear your thoughts.

Want more info on how to make FBA your full-time job? Scroll up , look at the right side of your screen, and subscribe.

 

How to Capitalize on a BOLO (Be On the Lookout)

Woman looking with binocularsLast week we talked about how to have a highly profitable Q4, and this week we’ll talk about another timely topic: how to capitalize on a BOLO.

What is a BOLO? It’s an acronym for “Be On the Look Out” and generally refers to a product that a reseller should be looking for to buy cheap and flip for a high profit margin. Usually, a reseller will share a BOLO when they’ve found something worth flipping, have run out of that particular item in their area,  and want to share that find with others. Most often, a BOLO is a hard-to-find item. In recent days, the topic of BOLOs have come up quite often on FBA forums and Facebook groups. In today’s post, we’ll talk about how to best handle a BOLO and how to use them to increase profits.

How to capitalize on a BOLO:

1. Double check to make sure that the item is worth reselling. Sometimes one man’s BOLO is another man’s NONO (sorry, I couldn’t resist). Ask yourself these questions: Does it have a sales rank you are comfortable with? Is the ROI (return on investment) high enough for you to take a trip to find that item? Make sure that this item fits into your definition of an item worth reselling.

IMG_8484

Here is the Tuesday Morning inventory hotline number


2. Once you know it’s worth going after, search all of the stores for that item. If a BOLO is shared about a particular item at Walgreens, go ahead and visit as many Walgreens as possible. Also, some stores have a phone number you can call to see if that item can be found at a store near you. For instance, you can call the Tuesday Morning hotline and give them the item number (found on the Tuesday Morning price tag) and your zip code, and the system will tell you all of the stores in your area that have that item (as well as how many they have!). Other stores can tell you their individual store inventories on their website. No need to go out looking for an item if you know ahead of time the store near you doesn’t have it.

3. Don’t just go into a store looking for one item. Search for other items in that store that you can be on the lookout for as well. Before heading out the door to Walgreens, do an online search for “BOLO Walgreens” and see if anything comes up for searching for.

IMG_84834. When you’re at the store, scan other items too. Don’t just go into the store and only grab your BOLO item. Start scanning so that you can find more potential items to resell. Check to see if the store has a clearance section. Look at the sale items. Look at everything, if you have time. Chances are, you’ll find even more great items to resell.

5. Make your purchases, get back to your computer, and send these items in ASAP! With other people also looking for the same item, you’ll want to be the first to get your items in to the Amazon warehouse. The more people who buy the BOLO, the more competition you’ll have, so you want the Amazon customer to find your item first.

Buying a BOLO item has the potential to be a great profit maker, but it also has some downsides to consider. Like I stated above, once someone makes a BOLO public, then everyone who sees it can go out and buy it. It brings about the potential for Amazon to have a high number of that item in its warehouses. Unfortunately, the more competition there is for a specific item, the more likely the item’s price will come down. Sometimes the prices lower slowly, but other times the prices reduce quickly. This is something to keep in mind when you are spending your hard-earned money on buying these items to resell. Be smart. Do your research. And don’t get involved in the race to the bottom.

blog-profitMy attitude toward a BOLO is to approach it with patience. I know that others might come in and try to undercut the current low price. I know I have no control over that, so instead I make sure I’m mentally ready for it. They can sell out at their low price, and I’ll sell mine later at the higher price I chose. With the holiday sales rush coming soon, I know that the sellers who price “too low”  will sell out rather quickly and I’ll eventually get the higher sales price I want. Remember, patience brings profit.

Some resellers are totally against sharing BOLOs. In our next blog post, we’ll talk about when to, how to, and if you should share a BOLO. We’ll also discuss what to do when someone else shares a BOLO that you thought only you knew about.

So how about you? How do you capitalize on BOLOs? What else do you do to make the most of your time and money when it comes to BOLOs? I’d love to hear your thoughts.

Want more info on how to make FBA your full-time job? Scroll up , look at the right side of your screen, and subscribe.